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Antonio Canova - Venus through the looking glass
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Antonio Canova - Venus and Fauno
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Antonio Canova -  Venus and Adonis
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Antonio Canova - Le Grazie
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Antonio Canova - Self-portrait
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Antonio Canova - Amorino Lubomirski
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Antonio Canova - Creugante
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Antonio Canova - Teseo winner on the Centaur
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Antonio Canova - Amore e Psiche
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Antonio Canova - Teseo sul Minotauro
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Antonio Canova - Danzatrice con le mani sui fianchi
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Antonio Canova - Danzatrice col dito al mento
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Antonio Canova - The surprise
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Antonio Canova - The Graces and Venus dance infront of Mars
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Antonio Canova - Paolina Borghese Bonaparte as the winning Venus
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Thomas Lawrence - Ritratto di Antonio Canova
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Antonio Canova - Cefalo e Procri
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Antonio Canova - Venus and Mars
Antonio Canova - Venus through the looking glass
Antonio Canova - Venus and Fauno
Antonio Canova -  Venus and Adonis
Antonio Canova - Le Grazie
Antonio Canova - Self-portrait
Antonio Canova - Amorino Lubomirski
Antonio Canova - Creugante
Antonio Canova - Teseo winner on the Centaur
Antonio Canova - Amore e Psiche
Antonio Canova - Teseo sul Minotauro
Antonio Canova - Danzatrice con le mani sui fianchi
Antonio Canova - Danzatrice col dito al mento
Antonio Canova - The surprise
Antonio Canova - The Graces and Venus dance infront of Mars
Antonio Canova - Paolina Borghese Bonaparte as the winning Venus
Thomas Lawrence - Ritratto di Antonio Canova
Antonio Canova - Cefalo e Procri
Antonio Canova - Venus and Mars

Other works on display

Description

Theseus on the Minotaur is a sculptural work created by Antonio Canova between 1781 and 1783 and the marble version is currently exhibited in the "Victoria and Albert Museum" in London. Theseus is seated on his opponent in an act of triumph: he holds in his hand the club with which he knocked down the bifiform being. The Minotaur is outstretched and lifeless: it lies lifeless, in an unnatural pose. This is considered as the first work in which Canova wanted to associate the study of nature with the observations made in Rome on classical works; for art history it is a turning point. The change of style consists precisely in the synthesis of the beauty of nature with the ideal beauty, the key to neoclassicism. The comparison of this work with the latest work of the Venetian period "Daedalus and Icarus" makes the change more effective: father and son are represented through a remarkable attention to the expressive, real and human data. On the other hand, with Teseo and the Minotaur the search for an idealized and perfect beauty worthy of a Greek hero stands out, which is achieved only thanks to Canova's studies on proportions and the human figure. In Theseus there is a "placid physiognomy, worthy of a hero who nobly takes pleasure in having won, which is of no great importance to him; the character of the Minotaur is in contrast to that of Theseus, and is in harmony with the whole work " TO CONTINUE THE SEARCH: Theseus, hero of Attica and son of the Athenian king Aegean, was famous for his sensitivity and strength. His father decided to test him from an early age, hiding his sandals and sword under a massive rock. Only when the boy had been able to lift the stone block and recover his belongings could he go to Athens and become king of the city. At sixteen his mother took him to the pre-established place and Theseus passed the test effortlessly and proudly. Once he took his father's place, however, he realized an unpleasant truth: every year his city was forced to deliver 14 young Athenians (7 boys and 7 girls) to the Minotaur. This monstrous beast was enclosed in a very complicated labyrinth created by Daedalus on the island of Crete and he only ate with the bodies of poor poorly-arrived. Theseus wanted to attempt the incredible feat of facing the Minotaur to free his homeland from the nightmare that oppressed it. So he prepared the expedition and trained with the heaviest weapons, but only thanks to the cunning of the Cretan princess Ariadne did he succeed. In fact, she taught him that, in order not to lose the right way back, it was enough to unroll a ball of thread along the way. Listening to his words, Theseus accomplished the fearsome undertaking and his people were forever grateful to him.

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