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Antonio Canova - Venus through the looking glass
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Antonio Canova - Venus and Fauno
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Antonio Canova -  Venus and Adonis
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Antonio Canova - Le Grazie
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Antonio Canova - Self-portrait
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Antonio Canova - Amorino Lubomirski
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Antonio Canova - Creugante
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Antonio Canova - Teseo winner on the Centaur
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Antonio Canova - Amore e Psiche
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Antonio Canova - Teseo sul Minotauro
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Antonio Canova - Danzatrice con le mani sui fianchi
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Antonio Canova - Danzatrice col dito al mento
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Antonio Canova - The surprise
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Antonio Canova - The Graces and Venus dance infront of Mars
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Antonio Canova - Paolina Borghese Bonaparte as the winning Venus
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Thomas Lawrence - Ritratto di Antonio Canova
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Antonio Canova - Cefalo e Procri
fullscreen
Antonio Canova - Venus and Mars
Antonio Canova - Venus through the looking glass
Antonio Canova - Venus and Fauno
Antonio Canova -  Venus and Adonis
Antonio Canova - Le Grazie
Antonio Canova - Self-portrait
Antonio Canova - Amorino Lubomirski
Antonio Canova - Creugante
Antonio Canova - Teseo winner on the Centaur
Antonio Canova - Amore e Psiche
Antonio Canova - Teseo sul Minotauro
Antonio Canova - Danzatrice con le mani sui fianchi
Antonio Canova - Danzatrice col dito al mento
Antonio Canova - The surprise
Antonio Canova - The Graces and Venus dance infront of Mars
Antonio Canova - Paolina Borghese Bonaparte as the winning Venus
Thomas Lawrence - Ritratto di Antonio Canova
Antonio Canova - Cefalo e Procri
Antonio Canova - Venus and Mars

Other works on display

Description

The dance that by its nature seeks beauty in motion, becomes the image par excellence of grace in Neoclassicism. The repetition of the dancing figures within the Canovian production is testimony to the artist's interest in studying the movement. Being a privileged theme, it translates it into numerous statues of goddesses, muses, mythological figures, reliefs, drawings and tempera paintings that exhibit a remarkable variety of movements and dance poses. The dancer with her finger to her chin is the second composition on the theme of a girl who dances and represents another example of the novelty in sculpture, in some ways modern, and confirms her convincing idea, independent of ancient models. The figure develops in a graceful wavy line, in which the delicacy of the slightly bent head, the slight movement of the arms and the soft clothes give off a strong gentle and gentle venustas (beauty). It was requested by the banker Domenico Manzoni of Forlì, wanting a work to be placed in a small temple and in 1814 the statue was finished. She was seriously offended and damaged in 1917 due to the cannonade that hit the Gypsotheca.

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