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Antonio Canova - Venus through the looking glass
fullscreen
Antonio Canova - Venus and Fauno
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Antonio Canova -  Venus and Adonis
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Antonio Canova - Le Grazie
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Antonio Canova - Self-portrait
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Antonio Canova - Amorino Lubomirski
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Antonio Canova - Creugante
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Antonio Canova - Teseo winner on the Centaur
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Antonio Canova - Amore e Psiche
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Antonio Canova - Teseo sul Minotauro
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Antonio Canova - Danzatrice con le mani sui fianchi
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Antonio Canova - Danzatrice col dito al mento
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Antonio Canova - The surprise
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Antonio Canova - The Graces and Venus dance infront of Mars
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Antonio Canova - Paolina Borghese Bonaparte as the winning Venus
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Thomas Lawrence - Ritratto di Antonio Canova
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Antonio Canova - Cefalo e Procri
fullscreen
Antonio Canova - Venus and Mars
Antonio Canova - Venus through the looking glass
Antonio Canova - Venus and Fauno
Antonio Canova -  Venus and Adonis
Antonio Canova - Le Grazie
Antonio Canova - Self-portrait
Antonio Canova - Amorino Lubomirski
Antonio Canova - Creugante
Antonio Canova - Teseo winner on the Centaur
Antonio Canova - Amore e Psiche
Antonio Canova - Teseo sul Minotauro
Antonio Canova - Danzatrice con le mani sui fianchi
Antonio Canova - Danzatrice col dito al mento
Antonio Canova - The surprise
Antonio Canova - The Graces and Venus dance infront of Mars
Antonio Canova - Paolina Borghese Bonaparte as the winning Venus
Thomas Lawrence - Ritratto di Antonio Canova
Antonio Canova - Cefalo e Procri
Antonio Canova - Venus and Mars

Other works on display

Description

Procri is lying on the ground while taking her last breath. The upper part of the body is raised so that a wound on the breast stands out: Céfalo, bent over her, cries, in despair he covers his face with his left hand, while with his right he picks up the bloodless hand for the last time, very white of her. Cèfalo warns all the remorse for the tragic mistake of hitting his woman who followed him, hidden by the bushes, during the hunting trip. In fact, Ovid tells, in the Metamorphoses, that Cèfalo, the beautiful son of Hermes, had the princess Procri as his wife, who however feared being betrayed by the young husband. The morning when Cephalus, while going hunting, was kidnapped by the goddess Aurora on Mount Imetto, Procri was overwhelmed by jealousy and wanted to follow the groom, hiding in the thick vegetation. So it was that the spear hurled by Cèfalo to a fox hit the beautiful Procri and killed her.

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