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Agolanti's Castle

The Castello degli Agolanti, or Tomb, takes its name from the noble Florentine family in exile who had it built in the first half of the 14th century, probably on a pre-existing building. The building is described in the documents of the time as a valuable fortified construction. Its history remains linked to the Agolanti until the eighteenth century. Many authors report the arrival of this prestigious family in Rimini around the end of the 13th century; with ups and downs it was linked to the Malatesta and various members of it held important positions within the local administration. In Riccione the Agolanti did not reside permanently, they used the Castle as a country residence to control the agricultural activity linked to their possessions or as a holiday and representation place. Rosita Copioli in an intervention by her in "Studi Romagnoli" indicates in the will of Cesare Agolanti, of 1415, the first mention of an Agolanti on the possession of the tomb. In the period of its maximum splendor, in the mid-seventeenth century, the Riccione Castle twice hosted Queen Christina of Sweden on a pilgrimage from her residence in Rome. In the period of its maximum splendor, in the mid-seventeenth century, the Riccione Castle twice hosted Queen Christina of Sweden on a pilgrimage from her residence in Rome.

Due to its important strategic position, the building constituted a privileged observation point, an outpost, so much so that in 1743 it was transformed into the headquarters of the Austrian army under the orders of General Lobkowitz. Even in the mid-eighteenth century it seems to be in good condition. Luigi Vendramin informs us, in his essay in Traces of history, that "we have news of various restorations and alterations that have taken place over time; the beautiful palace, no longer owned by the Agolanti since the beginning of the eighteenth century, passed subsequently to the Bertola (or Bertolli), Pedrocchi di Brescia, Buonadrata and others families. It was severely damaged by the earthquake of 1786, it was subsequently partly demolished and partly used as a farmhouse and remained so until, in 1982, it was sold by the Verni of S. Giovanni in Marignano to the municipal administration of Riccione, now reduced to a poor ruin ".

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Address

via Caprera
47838 Riccione

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