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Michelangelo Merisi, detto Caravaggio - Behold the man
fullscreen
Antonio Canova - Penitent Magdalene
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Peter Paul Rubens - Venus and Mars
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Filippo Lippi - Saints Sebastian, John the Baptist and Francis
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Paolo Caliari, detto il Veronese - Susanna and the Elders
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Alessandro Magnasco, detto Lissandrino - Entertainment in a garden of Albaro
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Luca Cambiaso - Self-portrait of the painter in the act of painting the portrait of his father
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Domenico Piola - Cain and Abel
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Luca Cambiaso - Madonna of the candle
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Valerio Castello - Madonna of the veil
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Jan Wildens - Landscape with tree-lined avenue
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Hans Memling - Sorrowful Christ in the act of blessing
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Jan Roos - Still life of fruit, vegetables and flowers
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Francesco de Zurbaran - Sant’Orsola
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Orazio De Ferrari - Christ and the adulteress
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Antonio Travi, detto il Sestri - Adoration of the shepherds
Michelangelo Merisi, detto Caravaggio - Behold the man
Antonio Canova - Penitent Magdalene
Peter Paul Rubens - Venus and Mars
Filippo Lippi - Saints Sebastian, John the Baptist and Francis
Paolo Caliari, detto il Veronese - Susanna and the Elders
Alessandro Magnasco, detto Lissandrino - Entertainment in a garden of Albaro
Luca Cambiaso - Self-portrait of the painter in the act of painting the portrait of his father
Domenico Piola - Cain and Abel
Luca Cambiaso - Madonna of the candle
Valerio Castello - Madonna of the veil
Jan Wildens - Landscape with tree-lined avenue
Hans Memling - Sorrowful Christ in the act of blessing
Jan Roos - Still life of fruit, vegetables and flowers
Francesco de Zurbaran - Sant’Orsola
Orazio De Ferrari - Christ and the adulteress
Antonio Travi, detto il Sestri - Adoration of the shepherds

Other works on display

Description

The painting is presented as an allegory: Love disarms Mars, god of war, who, astonished, surrenders to the busty charm of Venus and the intoxication caused by the wine contained in the silver flask and cup, offered to him by Bacchus, the god of the joy of living. Venus wears contemporary clothes and her face and her shapely physiognomy reflect the canons of beauty common in Rubensian production and do not belong, as the inventories of the Brignole - Sale house wanted, to the painter's second wife. Mars, on the other hand, wears the typical lansquenet attire and is not a self-portrait of the artist, as estimated by the aforementioned inventories, but reproduces the face, identical right down to the expression, of a member of the Van den Wijngaerd family, which Rubens portrayed at least other twice. The Fury that bursts, on the right, from the shadows of a landscape that, on the left, turns out to be desolate, burnt and upset by the war, was created with vibrant essential touches of brown and black directly on the reddish-brown preparation and contrasts with the sensuous chromatic intensity and the intact brightness of the impasto of the figures in the foreground, of Titian ancestry. Masterpiece of the Flemish artist's late maturity, datable between 1632 and 1635, the panel is mentioned for the first time in Genoa in about 1735, when it appeared to belong to Gio. Francesco II Brignole - Sale in the Palazzo Rosso; according to a recent survey, the painting nevertheless arrived in the city from Madrid about thirty years earlier, that is, after 1691. The events of the work in the following thirty years up to 1735 are still unknown.

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