spinner-caricamento
Share

MANDA - National Archaeological Museum of Abruzzo - Villa Frigerj verified

Chieti, Abruzzo, Italy closed Visit museumarrow_right_alt

fullscreen
Warrior of Capestrano
fullscreen
Ercole Curino
fullscreen
Heracles Epitrapezios
fullscreen
A statue of a civilian from Foruli
fullscreen
Statue of discophorus with head portrayed by Foruli
fullscreen
Statue of a character of military rank from Foruli
fullscreen
Zeus
fullscreen
Portrait by Alba Fucens
fullscreen
Male portrait by Alba Fucens
fullscreen
Osiris standing mummiform
fullscreen
Three-disc cuirass
fullscreen
Bronze fibula
fullscreen
Campovalano boots
fullscreen
Cooking pan
fullscreen
Be
fullscreen
Ring
fullscreen
Tables patronage di Amiternum
fullscreen
Bronze macaw
fullscreen
in Antef (n. 2)
fullscreen
in Antef (n. 1)
fullscreen
Face
fullscreen
Without title
Warrior of Capestrano
Ercole Curino
Heracles Epitrapezios
A statue of a civilian from Foruli
Statue of discophorus with head portrayed by Foruli
Statue of a character of military rank from Foruli
Zeus
Portrait by Alba Fucens
Male portrait by Alba Fucens
Osiris standing mummiform
Three-disc cuirass
Bronze fibula
Campovalano boots
Cooking pan
Be
Ring
Tables patronage di Amiternum
Bronze macaw
in Antef (n. 2)
in Antef (n. 1)
Face
Without title

Other works on display

Description

The tabulae patronatus represent official documents that had the function of reminding the bond existing between the citizens of a colony or a municipality and their patron, generally residing in Rome. In this sense, they correspond to the " private " function of the first cards, called hospitales, which since ancient times sanctioned a bond of hospitality between two contractors, the host and the guest: similar objects therefore provided for a "double copy", with which hospitality could be claimed. Similarly, the tabulae patronatus, widespread in the imperial age in the Roman provinces and in the fourth century. AD also in Italy, there were usually two, one public to be posted in the forum or other place reserved for community life, and the other private, intended for the patron's house, often mentioned by the inscription itself.
The tabulae patronatus, with a standardized content, could be drawn up in a short form, which provided for the choice of someone as patron and confirmation of the registration of the patronage, or in a long form, which also recalled the decree conferring the patronage. The latter is also the form of the two texts of Amiternum: the first tabula concerns the patronage on Amiternum conferred on Gaius Sallius Pompeianus Sofronius in 325 AD , while the second concerns the patronage on Foruli attributed to his son , with the same name, in the 335 AD . They are representatives of an Amiternina family whose existence is documented for over two centuries: the same tabulae remember three patrons over four generations.
The first text mentions the generous interventions of Gaio Sallio in favor of the city ("splendidissimae civitati nostrae"): the reactivation of the aqueduct (Aqua Arentani) and the offer of two days of theatrical performances for the inauguration of the thermal baths that Gaius Sallio himself had it rebuilt and equipped with arcades and statues. The second tabula, more concise, is no less interesting, as the conferral ceremony, unlike the first, is "pagan" or "vicana".
The two tables represent the last evidence of life in the town. The fact that they were found in Amiternum, about 150 m south-east of the amphitheater, near the walls of a large house, suggests identifying the building with the Domus dei Sallii, still inhabited in the fourth century. AD by its owners.

Other artworks in Chieti

Related searches

What you can find on Artsupp

Artsupp is the museums’ portal through which it’s easy to discover art, exhibitions and artworks. Now museums in France, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and Spain can also share their activities with users

About us