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National Archaeological Museum of Verona verified

Verona, Veneto, Italy closed Visit museumarrow_right_alt

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Painted stone known as the Shaman
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Vase with multiple mouths from the Frassino lake
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A cup
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Folded sword from Pila del Brancon
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Large bronze pin with disc head from La Quercia di Lazise
Painted stone known as the Shaman
Vase with multiple mouths from the Frassino lake
A cup
Folded sword from Pila del Brancon
Large bronze pin with disc head from La Quercia di Lazise

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Description

Painted stone known as the Shaman. Among the works of art in red ocher found in Grotta di Fumane and referable to the artistic activity of the first Sapiens, the most famous is this stone that depicts a character wearing a headdress.

The stylized image of the "Shaman" represented on the logo of the National Archaeological Museum of Verona is the so-called "shaman" of Grotta di Fumane (40,000 BP, Upper Paleolithic).

It is a limestone painted in red ocher and represents one of the oldest European pictorial expressions. This stone is the iconic find of Grotta di Fumane and is today one of the oldest theriomorphic figures on the planet. The figure is 18 cm high and its axis between the neck and groin corresponds to a small crest of the rocky support, while the lower limbs are spread apart with an arcuate pattern at a concavity. At the level of the navel, two small, non-symmetrical lateral prominences can be seen. Lower down, the body widens at the belly. On the side and under the right lower limb there is a colored area. Two symmetrical outward-facing protrusions detach from the head: they are interpreted as horns or, perhaps, the whole thing could be read as the silhouette of a mask. Under the distinct neck, two symmetrical strokes normally arranged at the main axis of the body represent the upper limbs; they end with two shorter strokes, facing downwards, which may correspond to the hands. The right holds an object that hangs, consisting of an upper and a lower part from which four sections come off, arranged in the form of a St. Andrew's cross: it is believed that it may be a ritual object. The painted stone could represent the silhouette of a Shaman, seen from the front, but it is not excluded that the line of the lower body, below the two lateral prominences, may refer to a theriomorph, a figure of man-animal known in Aurignatian art. .


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